Shell Identifies Significant Damage On GOM Facilities Following Ida

Shell Identifies Significant Damage On GOM Facilities Following Ida
Shell reveals significant structural damage on West Delta-143 offshore facilities following Hurricane Ida.

A comprehensive damage assessment of Shell’s West Delta-143 (WD-143) offshore facilities following Hurricane Ida revealed significant structural damage.

The damage assessment was conducted by Shell Offshore, a subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell. The company said on Monday that it estimates its WD-143 A platform facilities would be offline for repairs until the end of 2021 and that the facilities on the WD-143 C platform would be operational in the fourth quarter of 2021.

The WD-143 facilities serve as the transfer station for production from our assets in the Mars corridor in the Gulf of Mexico to onshore crude and natural gas terminals.

Given the timeline for repairs to WD-143, Shell expects to resume production from its Olympus platform, which flows across the WD-143 C platform, in the fourth quarter of 2021, and from our Mars and Ursa facilities, which flow across the WD-143 A platform, in the first quarter of 2022.

According to the company, the Perdido asset in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico was not disrupted by Hurricane Ida, and the floating production, storage, and offloading vessel (FPSO) Turritella – also known as Stones – is online.

At this stage of the recovery, approximately 60 percent of Shell-operated production in the Gulf of Mexico is back online.

“As we continue to assess and address the impact of Hurricane Ida on our businesses, our top priorities continue to be the protection and recovery of our people and assets, the community and the environment,” Shell stated.

It is worth noting that the WD-143 platform, owned by Shell Offshore with a stake of 71.5 percent while the remaining 28.5 percent is held by BP Exploration & Production. The platform is operated by Shell Pipeline Company.

As for the Mars corridor, it consists of the Shell-operated tension leg platforms Mars, Olympus, and Ursa. Mars and Olympus ownership is Shell Offshore (71.5 percent) and BP Exploration & Production (28.5 percent).

Ursa is owned by Shell Offshore with 45.3884 percent, BP Exploration & Production 22.6916 percent, ExxonMobil 15.96 percent, and ConocoPhillips 16.96 percent.


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