Offshore Norway Sees Discoveries and Dusters Over the Last Month

Offshore Norway Sees Discoveries and Dusters Over the Last Month
It's been a mixed bag in terms of oil and gas exploration offshore Norway over the past month or so.

It’s been a mixed bag in terms of oil and gas exploration offshore Norway over the past month or so, with both finds and dusters coming up.

On November 29, the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) revealed that Equinor Energy AS had concluded the drilling of exploration well 6507/8-11 S and that the well was classified as dry.

The objective of the well was to prove petroleum in Lower Jurassic and Triassic reservoir rocks in the Åre Formation and Grey Beds. The well encountered reservoir rocks in the Åre Formation and in Grey Beds, of which there were sandstone layers totaling 675 feet with good reservoir quality, the NPD noted. Weak traces of petroleum were encountered, however, according to the NPD.

Well 6507/8-11 S was drilled to a vertical depth of 8,175 feet below sea level and water depth at the site was 951 feet. The well has been permanently plugged and abandoned.

On November 4, the NPD revealed that a gas/condensate discovery near the Oseberg field in the North Sea had been made through OMV (Norge) AS’s exploration efforts. Well 30/5-4 S encountered a gas/condensate column of about 328 feet and well 30/5-4 A encountered a gas/condensate column of about 295 feet, the NPD highlighted.

Preliminary estimates placed the size of the discovery between 1.5 and 6.5 million Sm3 of recoverable oil equivalent. Well 30/5-4 S was drilled to a vertical depth of 16,414 feet below sea level and well 30/5-4 A was drilled to respective vertical and measured depths of 14,028 feet and 16,227 feet below sea level, the NPD outlined. Water depth at the site was said to be 311 feet.

On October 26, the NPD announced that Equinor Energy AS had concluded the drilling of wildcat well 6607/12-5 and that the well was classified as dry with traces of gas.

The objective of the well was to prove petroleum in Cretaceous reservoir rocks in the Lange and Lysing Formations, as well as to evaluate reservoir properties, according to the NPD, which said the well encountered reservoir rocks of about 219 foot thickness in the Cromer Knoll Group consisting of sandstones with interbedded silt and claystones with poor to no reservoir quality.

Well 6607/12-5 was drilled to a vertical depth of 12,667 feet below sea level and water depth at the site was 1,213 feet, the NPD highlighted.

To contact the author, email andreas.exarheas@rigzone.com


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