Giant North Sea Discovery Progressing



Giant North Sea Discovery Progressing
Equinor reveals the latest progress on the Johan Sverdrup project.

Equinor revealed Wednesday that the topside for the Johan Sverdrup processing platform has left the Samsung Heavy Industries yard on time and below budget.

The topside is heading for the Kvaerner yard on Stord where two pedestal cranes will be mounted, and further preparations will be made, before it is lifted into position at the Johan Sverdrup field in spring next year.

“The Johan Sverdrup project has been on a formidable improvement journey the last few years, mostly thanks to high quality in the execution phase. This has also been a defining characteristic of the delivery of the processing topside currently en route from South Korea to Norway,” Trond Bokn, Equinor’s senior vice president for the Johan Sverdrup development, said in a company statement.

“In cooperation with Aker Solutions, Samsung has delivered another high-quality topside for Johan Sverdrup according to plan and without serious incidents. Such deliveries are imperative to ensure a safe start-up of Johan Sverdrup in November 2019,” he added.

The processing platform is one of four platforms that make up the Johan Sverdrup field center in the first phase of the project. This platform, which will handle the processing and refining of all oil and gas from the first phase of Johan Sverdrup, has capacity for 440,000 barrels of oil per day.

In the second phase of Johan Sverdrup the field center will be extended with another processing platform with capacity for an additional 220,000 barrels of oil per day.

Johan Sverdrup is one of the largest oil discoveries ever made on the Norwegian Continental Shelf, Equinor highlights on its website. According to the company, the field has a resource estimate of between 2.2 and 3.2 billion barrels of oil equivalent and, at peak output, it will constitute 25 percent of all Norwegian petroleum production at the time.

The Johan Sverdrup field, described as a “giant” on Equinor’s website, was discovered in the North Sea in 2010-2011.

Partners in the field comprise Equinor (40.0267 percent operated interest), Lundin Norway (22.6 percent interest), Petoro (17.36 percent interest), Aker BP (11.5733 percent interest) and Total (8.44 percent interest).



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