WellDog Receives $200,000 Grant to Develop Guide for Coalbed Natural Gas In

WellDog, Inc., a Laramie, Wyoming-based energy technology company, received a $200,000 grant to develop a best practices guide for coalbed natural gas development. The award, from the Stripper Well Consortium at Pennsylvania State University, is funded by the Department of Energy through the university's Energy Institute in State College, Pennsylvania.

The grant covers the development of best practices for multi-zone completion wells. Results will be published upon completion of the project. WellDog will partner with Black Diamond Energy, Inc., to analyze wells in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. Multi-zone completions, which allow natural gas to be extracted from multiple seams in a wellbore, have not been commonplace in coalbed natural gas development due to the challenges of determining which coal seams within a well can be developed economically.

"WellDog's technology is of key importance in developing multi-zone wells because the required information about a well can be delivered within days, rather than waiting months using conventional analysis techniques," said Wayne Greenberg, CEO of WellDog. "Fast delivery of results means that developers can make rapid and more profitable decisions about which coal seams will produce the most gas with less water production, mitigating many of the environmental concerns associated with the production of this vital resource."

"Without these funds, Black Diamond probably wouldn't attempt a multi-zone completion on these thinner coals, however, in conjunction with WellDog and their excellent technology we are anxiously looking forward to this project," said Eric Koval, President of Black Diamond Energy, Inc. "We feel it will not only benefit the entire Powder River Basin, but other coal and shale plays throughout the country."


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