Frigg Stopped Producing October 26th


Frigg-Oseberg-Troll Complex, North Sea
(Click to Enlarge)
From its beginning Frigg has contributed considerably in the development of technology on the Norwegian shelf, contributed to the Norwegian supplier industry and has generated great values for the Norwegian society. The Frigg installations have also surpassed everyone's expectations with regard to safety and reliability.

Frigg stopped producing October 26, 2004. From its beginning Frigg has generated great values for the Norwegian society, has contributed to the Norwegian supplier industry and contributed considerably in the development of technology on the Norwegian shelf.

Thanks to a determined and successful planning and operation of the tail production, the final date for end of production has been postponed numerous times during the past few years. Good methods for draining the reservoir, combined with cost-effectiveness and efficient organisational solutions have contributed to extending the production.

Frigg started the production in September 1977 and His Majesty King Olav presided over the official opening of Frigg on 8 May 1978 with the unveiling of the plaque featuring the Norse goddess Frigg. The King opened the field with these words: "I hope that these constructions will work up to expectations." Since then the Frigg installations have surpassed everyone's expectations with regard to safety and reliability.

Frigg, which is situated 230 km northwest of Stavanger, was one of the first discoveries on the Norwegian Continental Shelf, thus making Elf (which was the company's name then) one of the pioneers. The licence was awarded to Elf in May 1969, and the production licence expires in May 2015. The first exploration well was drilled as early as April 1971, and the first discovery was made in the summer of 1971. The Frigg field was declared commercial in the spring of 1972. Since the field straddles the boundary line between the United Kingdom and Norway, a treaty had to be negotiated to govern the distribution of the resources. This treaty confirms that 60.82 percent of the resources are located on the Norwegian side of the border. Construction of the platforms commenced in September 1973.

The field consists of the following five platforms Quarters Platform (QP) living quarters, control room and other crew facilities, Treatment and Compression Platform 2 (TCP2), Treatment Platform 1 (TP1), Concrete Drilling Platform 1 (CDP1) and Drilling Platform 2 (DP2). In addition, the Drilling Platform 1 (DP1) steel structure, which was damaged during installation in 1974, is still in place on the field.

The Frigg field installations have three licence partners on the Norwegian side of the field:

TOTAL E&P NORGE AS 47.13 percent
Norsk Hydro 32.87 percent
Statoil 20.00 percent

Licensee on the British side of the field:
TOTAL E&P UK plc 100 percent
The Frigg area has been effectively drained not only through the main Frigg reservoir, but also through the surrounding satellite fields: North East Frigg, East Frigg, Lille-Frigg, Odin (owned and operated by Esso) and Fry (oil), which have all ceased production now.

The gas from Frigg was sold to customers in the United Kingdom. At the beginning of the 1980s, Frigg supplied the British with as much as one third of their natural gas requirements. Plateau production from 1978 to 1987 was approx. 16.5 billion Sm3 gas/year and 20,000 Sm3 condensate/year. The max. daily production was 80 million Sm3 gas per day. The total production of gas from the Frigg field on the British and Norwegian Shelves has reached 192 billion Sm3. The recovery rate is 78%, which is a good result in both a Norwegian and an international context.

The detailed planning of the removal work on the Frigg field will get underway during autumn 2004, and TOTAL E&P NORGE AS will award the major contract for the removal work during October.

The size of the project means that removal of the Frigg field will be a greater challenge than previous decommissioning projects. The approved Cessation Plan covers disposal of installations on both the Norwegian and British Shelves. The steel platform (DP2), steel substructure (DP1), the topsides of the concrete installation (TCP2) on the Norwegian side of the Frigg field and the steel platform (QP) and the topsides of TP1 and CDP1 on the British side will be removed and taken to land for disposal. In addition the field's internal pipelines and cables and waste on the seabed will be removed and taken to land.

After extensive clean-up, securing and marking, the concrete substructure for TCP2 on the Norwegian side and two concrete substructures on the British side will remain on the field.

The removal work is to be completed by the end of 2012.
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