Ex-Halliburton Manager Pleads Guilty

Deepwater Horizon Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill

Ex-Halliburton Manager Pleads Guilty

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A former Halliburton manager pleaded guilty Tuesday to destroying evidence in the aftermath of the deadly rig explosion that spawned BP's massive 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Anthony Badalamenti, 62, faces a maximum sentence of 1 year in prison and a $100,000 fine after his guilty plea in U.S. District Court to one misdemeanor count of destruction of evidence. His sentencing by U.S. District Judge Jay Zainey is set for Jan. 21.

Badalamenti was the cementing technology director for Halliburton Energy Services Inc., BP's cement contractor on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig. Prosecutors said he instructed two Halliburton employees to delete data during a post-spill review of the cement job on BP's blown-out Macondo well.

Last month, a federal judge accepted a separate plea agreement calling for Halliburton to pay a $200,000 fine for a misdemeanor stemming from Badalamenti's conduct. Halliburton also agreed to be on probation for three years and to make a $55 million contribution to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, but that payment was not a condition of the deal.

The April 20, 2010, rig explosion killed 11 workers and led to America's worst offshore oil spill.

In May 2010, according to prosecutors, Badalamenti directed a senior program manager to run computer simulations on centralizers, which are used to keep the casing centered in the wellbore. The results indicated there was little difference between using six or 21 centralizers.

The data could have supported BP's decision to use the lower number, but Justice Department prosecutor William Pericak said the number of centralizers had "little effect" on the outcome of the simulations.


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WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Post a Comment Generated by readers, the comments included herein do not reflect the views and opinions of Rigzone. All comments are subject to editorial review. Off-topic, inappropriate or insulting comments will be removed.
Jack Nelson | Oct. 18, 2013
Having more than 40 years experience in the offshore drilling industry, there is quite a difference in using 6 stabilizers as opposed to 21. Not enough stabilizers lets the casing lay against the formation. Laying against the formation means there is very little chance for cement to be all around the casing. Quite simple.

James Drouin | Oct. 18, 2013
In light of the instructions to the contrary and plain common sense, Mr Badalamenti should have been convicted of rank stupidity. He is truly lucky to have been judged by a system that recognized his inconsequentialness to the tragedy.


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