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BP: Halliburton Destroyed Test Results On Deepwater Horizon Cement

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Deepwater Horizon Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill

HOUSTON (Dow Jones Newswires), Dec. 5, 2011

BP on Monday accused oilfield-services giant Halliburton of destroying unfavorable results from tests on cement used to plug the leaking well in the Deepwater Horizon disaster.

Halliburton prepared the cement mix that BP had used to plug the deep-water well that blew out in April 2010, killing 11 and unleashing a huge oil spill. In a motion filed with a U.S. court in Louisiana, BP said that Halliburton's own tests after the incident showed the cement slurry was unstable and claimed the company destroyed the results of the test and misplaced key data.

Halliburton destroyed the evidence "in part because it wanted to eliminate any risk that this evidence could be used against it at trial," BP said in the filing. The U.K. oil company says it bases its motion on deposition testimony by Halliburton witnesses and internal documents. Halliburton didn't immediately respond to requests for comment.

BP's salvo is the latest in a multipronged legal fight pitting one of the world's largest oil companies against its contractors over their share of responsibility for the U.S. Gulf of Mexico oil spill. BP has said its contractors, including Halliburton, share part of the blame; Halliburton has said that BP directed all operations and is at fault. In September, Halliburton sued BP for defamation, and for providing inaccurate information before the cementing job in the Deepwater Horizon well.

According to BP's filing, Halliburton told its employees in late April or early May 2010 to test a batch of the cement at a facility in Duncan, Okla. The testing showed that the solids in the cement mixture were separating from the liquids, a sign of instability, according to BP.

BP says that a Halliburton employee said under oath that "he destroyed test results in order to keep the information from being 'misinterpreted' in ways adverse to Halliburton in litigation."

Copyright (c) 2011 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

More info on the Deepwater Horizon Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Post a Comment Generated by readers, the comments included herein do not reflect the views and opinions of Rigzone. All comments are subject to editorial review. Off-topic, inappropriate or insulting comments will be removed.
Aslam Raja | Dec. 10, 2011
There is no use now to blame someone like Halliburton; 11 People lost their lives, tons of oil spilled leaving the much talked about environment within USA, loss of marine life and jobs for the natives - now BP should concentrate on her operations so something like that does not happena again and also share their facts with the industry so others also take care. Because when an incident such like this happens, there is always a big paper work to follow.

Jack Satterfield | Dec. 9, 2011
May I first say that the men that died are in my prayers. Now with 23+ years of offshore HSE experience, I know that a poor cement job is readily apparent and (although expensive and time consuming) fixable thus avoiding a catastrophy such as what happened. Hopefully, whoever overrode the leakoff test results feels the pain of those who perrished as well as the pain they have left behind. To those of us who are experienced in this industry the culprit (s) are readily apparent.

ragab | Dec. 9, 2011
i thought that BP the only company to blame.

Armando Gutierrez | Dec. 9, 2011
This is not a surprise! Usually test results are reviewed with the company man in the field, after which he (Co.Man) calls in to touch base with the on duty Drilling Engineer. The Company Man has the final say so to proceed with the drilling program or do the remedial work to correct the situation. Due to rig time involved, it wouldn't surprise me that the Mud Engineer, Halliburton and the tool pusher informed the Company Man. Again due to rig time, Halliburton and probably the tool pusher convinced the Company Man to proceed with the drilling program and not worry about it!

Sam | Dec. 9, 2011
I worked in Halliburton for 5 years and I haven't seen corruption like I saw there. I sent Dave Lesar the CEO documents proving manufacturing tools locally carring no standard levels and selling them to customers as real Halliburton stuff. His reaction was giving the branch of Egypt a prize of making the highest profit margin. Yes they make a high profit margin cause they manufacture tool locally from Drill pipes remainings. It is a corrupted company from up to down.

Anonymous | Dec. 9, 2011
The day after the incident, I witnessed BPs shredding company haul away 4 to 5 truckloads of destroyed paperwork from the E&P head office in Houston. Was this regular maintenance or a cover-up? Also, all involved employees were instructed to erase their hard drives ... hmm ... coincidence?

DP | Dec. 9, 2011
What I would like to know is why the crews of Transocean were allowed to tear out the rig with all the gauges showing that the well was kicking and the alarms in the living quarters were allowed to be turned off because of multiple false alarms kept waking up crew members on their off shift. If they would have waited on cement and monitored the well for flow a little longer I think this all could have been prevented. If they would have payed attention to the well they would have seen the cement job was crap they could have pumped out the whole whopping nine cubes they pumped and still kept control of the well. I think this whole thing boils down to poor management out at the rig. I would never work on an offshore rig because all the stories I hear of catastrophic happenings on them usually boils down to retards working on them. As for HAL they destroyed evidence because the know they screwed up in their cement program. I work up here in Canada in a supervisory position and don't have a lot of good to say about HAL. They work their hands to the point of zombies and are always the first to point a finger if something goes south. That is my rant for the day. THX

Bill Martin | Dec. 7, 2011
There is an extreme amount of misdirection and deflection going on as this legal maneuvering gets reported in a haphazard manner. You ought to check out the story about how BP (quite possibly unethically) came into some of the information they are trying to get HAL to divulge. It is in the court records that BP hired an engineer through a contractor who had previously worked for HAL (allegedly took some of HALs confidential info on cementing with him when he left on a thumb drive). Funny how this part of the story was missed by the major media.

Micah Tatum | Dec. 6, 2011
I (had) 21+ years experience with them. I was asked to give up my 2010 focal point (raise) because of this mess. When the business did not pick up it was panic city. Then to learn they built a rebuild facility in Lafayette. I was upset because it used to be team effort, but now its CYA all the way down. My job wont be replaced because everything is being moved to Lafeyette. Mis-Management from the top down..

Charles Reynolds | Dec. 6, 2011
I think you need to speak to the survivors of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. I remember early interviews that pointed to the crew that was working did so under protest because the Halliburton guys were walking off due to BP officials override of the cementing process with the blow out preventer in operable. All this lawyer speak is for publicity. There is plenty of blame to go around but that wont bring that crew back to life. We need to learn from this and move forward.

kenneth tillbrook | Dec. 6, 2011
with close ties to the unaccountable anti Americans in wash.d.c. it does not surprise me,them campaign constructions are more important then tha truth

Luis Vera Barboza | Dec. 6, 2011
Halliburton is great as to work and learn, got most of my experience in this first class school, but unfortunately some people destroys this good image and reputation gained with hard work and efficient people. After 20 years I was pushed to the abyss for refusing to accept unethical procedures, lost a brilliant career that I had made along 20 years. I want to stress up that is not the company but people passing through. Regards Lucho Vera

Jay Beigh | Dec. 6, 2011
So much for deep partnerships. Not to mention good neighbor/ good citizen concepts. This is my eye, this is my industry, my future... I now punch myself, in the eye, again. As a dog returns to its vomit, so a fool to his folly (Proverbs)

Vanghele Nasta | Dec. 6, 2011
Even they destroyed the evidence, CBL will confirm Halliburton very understandable mistake!

KENTON A COOKE | Dec. 6, 2011
I THINK INSTEAD OF POINTING FINGERS ABOUT WHO IS AT FAULT BP, HALLIBURTON, TRANSOCEAN SHOULD BE LOOKING IN THE DIRECTION OF HOW TO PREVENT THIS TYPE OF CATASTROPHE FROM EVER HAPPENING AGAIN. AS FAR AS I AM CONCERNED BP IS THE ONE WHOM SHOULD ACCEPT THE ULTIMATE BLAME. THEY ARE THE PEOPLE WHO HIRED HALIBURTON, AND TRANSOCEAN. IT'S A REAL SHAME THE FAMILIES HAVE BEEN THE BIG LOSERS IN THIS WHOLE MESS. NEXT THING YOU KNOW BP WILL WANT TO SUE TRANSOCEAN BECAUSE THEIR RIG WAS NOT FIRE PROOF GET REAL PEOPLE

Ken Rose | Dec. 5, 2011
The word is BP and Halliburton new at the time of the blow out the cement job was bad. So why would the test results need to be destroyed.

Peter Cheek | Dec. 5, 2011
Well, this is the way I see it, BP told Halliburton Energy Services what the wanted to cement that long string of casing with, how much pumping time on the cement needed to have and compressive strength of the slurry after it is in place. All these factors need to be taken into account and I'm sure Halliburton did these procedures, also BP is trying to put the blame on whomever it can. Had BP not have taken all the shortcuts that they make Halliburton, Transocean and others involved in this well, 11 men would still be with their family. I'm stating these comments because I cemented oil & gas well for well over 30 plus years.


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